Archive for the Art Category

Follow ‘Freedom For Vietnam’ on Instagram

Posted in Announcements, Art with tags , , , , , , , on January 5, 2017 by Ian Pham

ffvn-instagramImage by: Ian Pham / Freedom For Vietnam

Good news! As readers of Freedom For Vietnam, you can now follow this blog on Instagram.

The Freedom For Vietnam Instagram account was put into Beta testing a little earlier than last year (if by Beta testing, one means creating an account, not telling anyone about it, and then forgetting that it exists for the next 12 months), and is now ready to be officially unveiled to the public.

On top of providing you top quality content via this blog, Freedom For Vietnam will now be able to stay in touch with its readers through the magic of sharing pictures and emojis and stuff. Not only can you communicate with me by commenting on this blog like always, you can now also communicate with me through the Instagram photos’ comments section, try to slide into my DMs, and then have me not reply to your messages. It’ll be a grand old time!

Jokes aside, I am very excited to implement this new Instagram feature. I have some plans in store for you all, in terms of original social media content, which I will gradually unveil as they become ready. Moreover, I will be sharing existing quality content both from around the web and elsewhere, thus creating an amalgamation of personal and outside works, all as a means to exemplify the beauty and sophistication of Vietnamese history and culture. Hopefully, you will find the material enjoyable, educational, and inspirational.

If you have not seen the account yet, here is a rundown of what you’ve missed so far:

 

This beautiful and iconic photo was taken by Benjamin Vu on April 30, 2010 at Westminster, California, USA. Known among Vietnamese communities overseas as "Black April," April 30 is a day of commemoration for the fall of the nation of South Vietnam to the Communist North. Every year, on the 30th of April, Vietnamese communities across the free world gather to remember the former Republic of Vietnam, the brave soldiers who gave their lives in defense of the nation and its ideals of freedom and democracy, and the refugees who fled South Vietnam in the wake of the communist takeover and thereafter, in search of a better life. The year 2010 marks the 35th anniversary of Black April and the fall of Saigon. According to the photographer, the woman in the photo was in attendance at the memorial event in California, and was standing next to this Heritage and Freedom flag for a very long time. #Freedom #Memorial #SouthVietnam #Woman #Flag #Beauty #Photography #BlackApril #NoFilter (Via https://flic.kr/p/7XBtuA)

A post shared by Freedom For Vietnam (@freedomforvietnam) on

 

 

 

This is just the start.

Furthermore, just in case you are one of the people who stumbled upon this account within the past year, and had questions about its authenticity, your fears can now be alleviated. This account is legitimate, it is real, and is the official Instagram account of this here Freedom For Vietnam blog.

So, if you have a minute, pay a quick visit to the freedomforvietnam Instagram page above, give it a follow, like some pictures, make some comments, and tell your friends, families, and acquaintances. The more word gets out and the more followers this account receives, the farther our message of freedom will reach. We have an opportunity, not only to connect with the many vast Vietnamese communities all over the world, including within Vietnam, but also to reach everyone else at large, in all communities across the world.

I look forward to continuing to write for you all on here, and am now excited to provide you with awesome content in other social media outlets as well. Thank you so much for your continued support, words cannot describe the gratitude I have for all of you readers. Thank you!

Happy 2017, everyone. See you on Instagram.  🙂 ❤ 😀

Happy 2016! Enjoy This Wallpaper

Posted in Announcements, Art, Modern History, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , on January 2, 2016 by Ian Pham

Respect The Heroes - WallpaperImage by: Ian Pham/Freedom For Vietnam

Happy 2016, everybody!

Freedom For Vietnam would like to ring in the new year by presenting you all with a little treat. Wanna know what it is? It’s the picture above. Surprise!

I designed the wallpaper above myself, using my ultra-fascinating computer-using skills, and the result is this masterpiece you see before you. Impressed? Don’t lie, you’re impressed.

Guess how much effort I put into it? … a lot, actually. :/

Jokes aside, I hope you enjoy the picture. It sets the tone for this new year we have upon is, which is going to be an amazing one. The picture essentially speaks for itself, delivering the message that we are grateful for our freedom, that we support our troops, and that we fucking hate communism.

We’re coming for those piece of shit commies, it’s just a matter of time.

Well, I hope you’ve all had a fantastic start to your 2016. If not, well then you can start right now!

I expect great things this year, you should too.

Once again,

Happy New Year, everybody!

Ian

Original Wallpaper/Art Commemorating South Vietnam and the ARVN

Posted in Art, Modern History, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 11, 2015 by Ian Pham

ARVN Flag & Motto WallpaperImage by: Ian Pham/Freedom For Vietnam

Last month, Friday, June 19, 2015, was the 50th anniversary of South Vietnam’s National Armed Forces Day (“Ngày Quân Lực Việt Nam Cộng Hòa” in Vietnamese), a day to commemorate and thank the brave soldiers of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam for their sacrifices in defense of the former nation’s freedom. The day was celebrated annually in South Vietnam, and after the nation’s fall on April 30, 1975, it would be carried over and celebrated by Vietnamese refugees overseas.

Although I did not get a chance to write about that day at the time it took place, I still want to share with you all my own small way of honoring the sacrifice of South Vietnam’s brave soldiers.

I made the above picture myself, sort of, using my ultra basic computer animation/Photoshop skills. Before explaining the details of this self-explanatory picture, I must first give credit to the 720mpreunion.org website from which I acquired the image for the flag of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, the centerpiece of this art/wallpaper. I did not draw that flag myself, but merely included it as part of my design. So, with credit given where credit is due, let’s talk about the picture.

As explained above, the emblem in the picture is the flag of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam. It is headed by an eagle, clasping two swords in each claw, surrounded by two laurel wreaths, and carrying the Coat of Arms of South Vietnam on its chest. Behind the eagle are the three horizontal red stripes of South Vietnam’s national flag, which represents the three regions of Vietnam: The North, the Central, and the South.

Under the eagle is a banner that reads:

Tổ Quốc, Danh Dự, Trách Nhiệm,”

This is the official motto of the Republic of Vietnam and its armed forces, and in English means:

Fatherland, Honor, Duty.”

This takes us to the part of the wallpaper/art that I actually worked on myself. The yellow background, and the prominent, in-your-face, black-colored writing in English that reads, “Fatherland. Honor. Duty.” That was all me, people. Pretty crazy, right?

I know the design is simple, but I think it conveys the message strongly.

South Vietnam and its armed forces had a proud and noble motto. They fought by it, and they died by it. The Republic of Vietnam was a democratic nation that championed the rights and freedoms of its citizens. The ARVN defended their country with courage, pride, and dignity. It is because of these reasons that even after 40 years since the nation’s fall, we still honor this nation and its brave soldiers.

We are proud of our South Vienamese legacy, and we will remember the courage and sacrifice that its soldiers made in defense of our freedom.

To the soldiers of the ARVN, from all freedom-loving Vietnamese people everywhere, we thank you.

The Sword of King Câu Tiễn

Posted in Ancient History, Art, I. News with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 25, 2011 by Ian Pham

King Câu Tiễn (or Kou Chien/Goujian in Chinese) was a ruler during ancient times.  Câu Tiễn was the leader of the Kingdom of Yueh, over 2500 years ago, at the dawn of the Warring States.  Yueh was one of the contending states during the Spring and Autumn period, after the fall of the Eastern Zhou.  Under the leadership of King Câu Tiễn, the Yueh Kingdom broke free from the grasp of the ancient Wu, re-emerged to conquer that Wu kingdom, and became one of the more powerful states of this era.  The Yueh Kingdom would reign for several centuries, before being swallowed up by the State of Chu.

The Kingdom of Yueh was distinct from the other kingdoms, as they were related to the people of Bách Việt, different from the nomadic tribes.  Geographically, the Kingdom of Yueh is located further north than the other Viet clans.  It can therefore be suggested that Câu Tiễn was a descendent of either the Ư Việt, Hồ Việt, or Đông Việt, as opposed to the Lạc Việt, who were located farther in the south.  During this period, King Câu Tiễn, with the help of his brilliant advisor Phạm Lãi (Fan Li), won many major conflicts against the kingdoms of Wu and Chu, turning Yueh into a major contender of this all-out war.

Today, in a museum exhibit somewhere in China, lays the sword of King Câu Tiễn.  Shown here are photos of the exact same blade wielded by the King of Việt over 2500 years ago.  If you look closely, you will notice the very interesting writing located on the face of the sword.  I’m no expert in Chinese literature, nor am I an expert in ancient Việt texts.  It doesn’t take an expert however, to notice the damning resemblance with the writing on this sword and the Nôm characters of ancient Việt.

It is very interesting that in Chinese history, Việt Vương Câu Tiễn (Kou Chien, King of Yueh) was said to be a Chinese man.  Obviously, with the fact that the Yueh Kingdom was located where the Bách Việt used to be, and that the name Yueh directly translates to mean Việt, it is clear that Kou Chien is Vietnamese.  Even more interesting are the writing found on his blade, which shares a shocking resemblance to the ancient scriptures of the Bách Việt civilization.

During the period of the Spring and Autumn, and the era of the Warring States, the country known as China had not yet been formed.  Instead, many independent states emerged, each with their own ways of communicating.  It just so happens that the Kingdom of Việt’s system of writing were the Nôm from Bách Việt.  The writing on King Câu Tiễn’s sword is different from the writing of the later imperial Chinese, and strongly suggests that the Kingdom of Việt communicated using the ancient Nôm of Bách Việt.  Furthermore, the grammar on the sword is distinct from the Chinese, meaning that Câu Tiễn not only wrote in Vietnamese, but spoke Vietnamese as well.

Political Cartoon: Dominoes

Posted in Art, Political Cartoons, Politics with tags , , , on March 27, 2011 by Ian Pham

Hey there dear readers, this blog has taken a hit in the past few weeks.  So many things have been going on, making it difficult to put out new blog posts.  I thought that the worst of it is over, but surprise!  There is still so much going on, making it hard to stay focused.  Well, life is full of surprises, and that is something that will never change.  Thus, I will continue to blog and try my best to keep you updated and entertained in the days to come.

This is a political cartoon that is proving to be true in the Middle East and North Africa, with the potential to spread even to the countries of Asia.  However, it is unfortunate that the momentum has lost its steam along these lines, for the Communists have carefully prepared for the coming wave.  China and Vietnam have been successful in preventing the Jasmine Revolution from hitting their respective frontiers, blocking the flow information and bitterly smashing any signs of dissent from the population.

Even so, I am optimistic that the change sweep across Asia as it is doing in the Middle East.  The difference here is that the  Communist system has established a monopoly in every aspect of the country, so it is without a doubt that any challenge to this extreme totalitarian regime will take much longer t0 develop.  That being said, the days of the Communists  are numbered.

This is especially true in Vietnam’s case.  The countless betrayals of the  Vietnamese Communist Party continues to erode their legitimacy, making them weaker than their counterparts in China.  The stupid governing of the Vietnamese Communist Party is slowly pushing their people to the breaking point, and ever closer to a real revolution.  The same can be said in China, though they are in a more advantageous position over their own people than the Vietnamese Communists.

So for these reasons, the amazing accomplishments that have created a domino effect in the Middle East and North Africa has much potential in reaching Asia.  But because the Communists have such a tight grip on the people, it will take longer for the movements to cultivate.  Even so, the people of Asia want democracy.  Vietnam, China, Burma, and all the other dictatorships are fighting for their very existence, and even one spark can change the course of history.  Let’s fight for it together.

Editor’s Note: One year and one day ago, March 26, 2010, Freedom For Vietnam was established.  It is amazing how many readers have found their way here in such a short amount of time.  Thank you for visiting, and we hope that you all continue to enjoy what we have to give.  Cheers!

Political Cartoon: Tunisia the Catalyst

Posted in Art, Political Cartoons, Politics with tags , , , , on March 1, 2011 by Ian Pham

Here is a great political cartoon that pretty much speaks for itself.  It all started with Tunisia, then it spread to Egypt, and now Libya.  Needless to say that the Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia was a catalyst, sparking numerous uprisings across North Africa and the Middle East.  These uprisings are fought in the name of freedom and democracy, a big blow to dictatorships everywhere.

This democratic movement has gained tremendous momentum, affecting not only the Middle East, but potentially reaching Asia as well.  It is now common knowledge that the rulers China and Vietnam, the last of the Communist dictatorships, are terrified of what this could mean for their one-party rule.  That is why they are sinking all their resources into preventing their people from becoming aware of the events spreading across the Middle East.

Even so, anonymous democratic organizers are calling upon the people of China to come together and fight the oppressive rule of the Chinese Communist Party.  In Vietnam, the police are preparing for the coming conflict against the Vietnamese population who are ready to fight for their rights and freedoms.  It started in Tunisia, but has swept passed Egypt into Libya, and is now seeping into the tightly controlled totalitarian countries of Vietnam and China.

It is a ticking time bomb, one that these Asian dictatorships are desperately trying to prevent.  This cartoon suggests that the revolutions will not only hit Vietnam and China, but will wash away the oppressive regimes in Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar (Burma) as well.  The governments of all these nations are doing everything they can to keep the Jasmine Revolution from coming to them.

They are scared out of their minds as they witness the fall of their counterparts in distant countries.   Now they must come to terms with the very real possibility of being toppled by their people.  The time is right for the citizens to overthrow these oppressors and bring the world ever closer to a period of peace and cooperation.  We must send our best wishes to all the people in this struggle.  Support the revolution!  Freedom and democracy now!

Political Cartoon: Don’t Say a Word

Posted in Art, Political Cartoons, Politics with tags , , , , on December 10, 2010 by Ian Pham

“Open lips make

the teeth turn cold…

Biting the lips…

will make them silent.”

This one is rather complicated.  It represents the relationship between Vietnam and China.  Apparently, China’s relationship with Vietnam are like tooth and lip.  China is in control and can keep Vietnam quiet at their will. Tooth and lip is a figure of speech in Vietnamese, quite perplexing if you ask me.

“Open lips make the teeth turn cold,” was a quote by Ho Chi Minh, comparing how Vietnam and China went hand in hand.  The second line, “Biting the lips… Will make them silent,” is a sarcastic ridicule by the author of the cartoon.  He mocks the stupidity of Ho Chi Minh, showing how his policies have eroded Vietnam’s sovereignty.

This is another cartoon about the Chinese invasion of the Paracel and Spratly islands.  It mostly demonstrates the coercive nature of the Peoples’ Republic of China, at the same time showing the weakness of the Vietnamese Communist Party.

The Communist Vietnamese are cowardly, staying silent while the Chinese government takes the islands away from the Vietnamese people.  They don’t resist, nor do they let the people of Vietnam resist.  Any stand made by the common folk are immediately crushed by the VCP, for fear of offending the invaders.  It’s shameful.