Archive for Saigon

Footage: Protesters in Saigon Fight Back Against Government Crackdown, Police Forced to Flee

Posted in Politics, Society with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2015 by Ian Pham

Saigon Protest, April 2015

Photo via Dan Lam Bao

Earlier this month, the city of Saigon and its surrounding areas were swept by a series of major worker demonstrations. The protests lasted more than a week, and sparked a confrontation between communist authorities and protest participants. Resistance to government crackdown was so fierce that members of the VCP police were forced to flee, with protesters giving chase.

For eight consecutive days, workers took to the streets to protest against the Vietnamese Communist government in response to a new law passed last November that limits citizens’ eligibility to claim social insurance. As a result of the new legislation, the people of Vietnam are unable to collect the social insurance money, which they have been paying into all their working lives, until the ages of 55 and 60, for women and men, respectively.

The social insurance fund is paid for by the working population of Vietnam through taxes, and is supposed to be available to the people during periods of unemployment. However, because of the new law passed by the Communist government, the people will be unable to claim any of this money until they are well approaching the age of seniority. This presents some obvious problems, such as the fact that the majority of Vietnam’s working population is well below the age range of 55-60, and are therefore the largest age group that will need to claim this money.

Another pressing issue that workers identify with this social insurance legislation is the fear that there may not be any money left in the fund by the time they reach ages 55 and 60. As one may or may not know, the VCP has a tendency to appropriate money inappropriately, allocating funds that do not belong to them right into their own pockets. Corruption within the VCP is a widely known reality, and like the many cases in the past, it is suspected that the government is siphoning money from the social insurance fund, just like they do in so many other areas of the treasury. The age restriction is believed to be a ploy by the Communist Party to bide time and prevent citizens from claiming money that no longer exists as a result of government corruption.

Thus, in reaction to the new law and all its implications, the workers in Southern Vietnam assembled in the streets of Saigon to protest against the VCP. The protests lasted for eight days between late March and early April, 2015, and drew as many as 90,000 participants on its first day alone. It would eventually expand to nearby cities as well, sparking strikes in Binh Duong, Long An, Tay Ninh, and Tien Giang.

In typical communist fashion, the police were called in to terrorize and crackdown on the protesters, with the ultimate goal of crushing the demonstration. However, in an unprecedented twist, the protesters in Saigon turned against the government forces and fought them back, causing many policemen to flee from the scene.

The event is captured on video and can be seen below, via Dan Lam Bao:

As can be seen, the VCP police force attempted to surround the protesters using their typical crackdown tactics. Only this time, the protesters pushed them right back, and in the end, caused the police to break up and run like a pack of ducks. Just goes to show how cowardly the communist forces actually are. They are trained to surround, isolate, and terrorize people who don’t fight back. When met with fierce resistance however, as exemplified by the video above, they just drop everything and run.

Communist Police Running Away From Protesters

Communist police. Bunch of pathetic losers.

DMCS.

Sources:

Ban doc Dan Lam Bao, Ban doc Dan Lam Bao (2), CTV (Dan Lam Bao)Hoang Tran (Dan Lam Bao), Ngoc An (Dan Lam Bao)

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Video: Last Week’s Protest in Saigon

Posted in Politics, Society, Videos with tags , , , , on May 17, 2014 by Ian Pham

This is a video of the anti-China protest in Saigon last Sunday, May 11, 2014. It may seem like old news at this point, as this week bore witness to some truly groundbreaking developments across the country. The movement is only gaining steam, and within hours from now, further protests are set to take place inside Vietnam.

I still feel inclined to post this video though, because certain parts of it are just too great not to share.

What makes this video so share-worthy? This, right here.

Flag Pull Down

For anyone unsure of what is happening in this picture, I’ll break it down for you:

That red flag is Vietnam’s communist flag. According to news circulating around the web, some communist party jerks were instructed to attend the protest and insert that flag into the crowd in an attempt to simulate public support for the VCP (Vietnamese Communist Party). This young lady, clearly offended by this idiotic ploy, took it upon herself to rip down the flag and show the communists what the real deal was.

Take that, communism.

Good luck to everyone out there in Vietnam. We’re all with you. Give ’em hell.

Major Developments In Vietnam Right Now

Posted in Politics, Society with tags , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2014 by Ian Pham

May 11 ProtestThere is a storm brewing in Vietnam right now, people. China has been steadily escalating its encroachment on Vietnamese territory, and at this point in time, it seems that the Vietnamese people have finally had enough. This past Sunday, spontaneous demonstrations broke out in Saigon, Hanoi, Danang, and Vinh, spreading like wildfire and growing into full-on political protests with a total of over 3,000 attendees across the four cities.

China has recently transported its large oil rig into Vietnam’s EEZ (Exclusive Economic Zone), sparking outrage among the Vietnamese populations, both domestically and abroad. Last week, moreover, the Chinese navy is condemned internationally for harassing Vietnamese boats, spraying personnel with heavy duty water hoses, and injuring 8 people.

These incidents are fairly recent, taking place within the last 14 days. Indeed, the events fit perfectly with China’s long pattern of aggressive and illegal behavior on the world stage. The list of belligerent actions that the PRC commits against its neighbors in the Pacific is fairly hefty, and worse, shows no sign of diminishing.

China’s heinous actions against Vietnam include state-sponsored piracy against Vietnamese fishermen in the Southeast Asia Sea, unsubstantiated claims to vast amounts of territory in the Pacific, increased military presence in the Paracel and Spratly Islands, and an overall aggressive tone towards its weaker neighbors. The list is by no means limited to these well documented events, as the PRC is understood to also have disputes with Japan and the Philippines over similar issues regarding sovereignty and security.

For the longest time, with heavy suppression from the Communist government in Hanoi, the people of Vietnam have been prevented from protesting China’s belligerency. Though demonstrations and gatherings are still planned and orchestrated at various times, they are always crushed by government forces, with heavy penalties for those involved.

Binh Duong ProtestsLately however, with this past Sunday being a prime example, it seems that the government is no longer able to prevent the people of Vietnam from defending their own country. Just today, in the industrial area in Binh Duong province, one protest exploded to a scale unprecedented in Vietnam’s recent memory, with over 10,000 people in attendance. The momentum seems to be growing, as further protests are planned for this Sunday throughout Vietnam.

It’s still too soon to tell what will happen, but from the looks of things, the situation is beginning to really heat up in the Communist-controlled state. I’ll do my best to keep you all updated on the situation. It’s going to be an interesting summer in Vietnam this year.

Prayers in the Cities: Hanoi and Saigon

Posted in Politics, Society with tags , , , , , on October 2, 2011 by Ian Pham

According to Spero News (September 26, 2011), over 2,000 Christian Redemptorists gathered in the cities of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City this week to pray for the safety and well-being of Vietnam’s political prisoners.  Religious freedom, peace for the country, and the release of the detainees were all among the wishes of the people.  It is not said whether the gathering was broken up by authorities or not, one could probably perceive this as a good sign.

It would be naive of me to say that this event could spark a revolution in Vietnam, for this event is much too small for that.  However, I will take the event for what it is, a positive act by the people.  Besides the anti-China protests, now stifled by the Communist government, any forms of protests and gatherings in Vietnam rarely last.  This religious gathering by Vietnamese Christians is probably no exception.  Though there is no coverage of violent repression by security forces, it is almost definite that the police dispersed or even detained some individuals.

Any talks of freedom in Vietnam are swiftly and forcefully crushed by the Vietnamese police, this time is no different.  It is difficult for the Communists to lay charges to peaceful worshippers, but they always find a way around it.  In the same Spero News article, interviews of everyday individuals in Vietnam bring to light some disturbing tactics used by the Party. Instead of outright detention of peoples of interest, the Communist Party arrests them secretly, in order to not draw attention to themselves. Religious figures are common victims of these kidnappings, for they hold influence among the population.  Therefore, public detainments of these individuals would spark anger among the population, causing difficulties for the Communists.

The prayers in the cities of Vietnam may not be a very strong political statement, the event itself is quite minor.  However, it takes quite a bit of courage to go out and worship in a society where religion is a major target of the government.  Not only that, but the prayers are for the freedom of religion and just treatment of detained religious leaders.  This probably will not lead to a major movement that will overthrow the Communist Party of Vietnam, but it is still a noteworthy move in this struggle for freedom.

Fighting For Vietnam

Posted in Politics, Society with tags , , , , , , , , on June 26, 2011 by Ian Pham

Protest is the word for Vietnam this weekend, as young Vietnamese people from all across the globe have risen to show their disgust for the crimes of Red China.  From Paris to Tokyo, the people of Vietnam have come together in unity, expressing their undying love for their homeland in the face of Chinese aggression.  The story however, is even bigger inside of Vietnam.  Hours from now, possibly even as we speak, large-scale demonstrations are set to take place in the cities of Hanoi and Saigon.

It is unclear how large these protests are going to be, or how long they will last.  Even more unpredictable however, is what will happen once these demonstrations actually take place.  The Communist Party in Vietnam has been extremely uncharacteristic as of late, allowing the people to protest against China, but even they have their limits.  Last week, as the third round of protests were underway, the Communist Police in Saigon surrounded the homes of all prominent protest leaders and prevented them from participating.  As a result, the scale of the protests in Saigon was dramatically reduced and quickly dispersed by the security forces of the VCP.

The protests set for today are supposed to be the biggest by far, calling upon everyone in Vietnam to stand up and rise against the tyrannies of Red China.  This can be a monumental event, but it can also have a terrible, violent outcome.  As mentioned in the past, the Communists are professional killers, specially trained and bred to eliminate any threat in the name of the Party.  A protest of this scale will almost definitely spark some type of Communist reaction.  It is possible that there may be patriots within the Party itself, but even so, experience and history reminds us that the VCP can never be trusted.

For now, the best we can do is support the people inside of Vietnam.  If a real change were to come, the people inside Vietnam will be the ones to lead the way.  We in the west too have the capacity to help the motherland, but for now, we are only on the outside looking in.  In order to understand what Vietnam truly needs, one must understand how brutal the regime truly is.  The people on the inside have shed blood, sweat, and tears through this regime every single day.  For this reason, they will be the ones to make a change.

There is no telling what will happen tonight, the only thing one can be sure of is that the people will not give up.  For too long, the people of Vietnam have been terrorized by the Party, living through their ruthless repression, and watching them sell out to China.  It is time the Party understood the determination of the Vietnamese people.  If the government cannot defend the country, the people surely will.  We will prevail.

Anti-China Protests in Hanoi and Saigon

Posted in Politics, Society with tags , , , , , , on June 5, 2011 by Ian Pham

The Vietnamese people have taken to the streets in reponse to the Chinese invasion of the Paracel and Spratly islands.  Earlier today, the people of Vietnam gathered outside of the Chinese Embassy in Hanoi to demonstrate against the recent acts of aggression of the PRC in the South China Sea.  Hundreds also met up in Ho Chi Minh City, aka Saigon, to protest against Communist China.

Wearing red t-shirts and carrying flags and banners, the protesters stood outside the embassy chanting slogans comdemning China for their expansionist and belligerent nature.  The police and security forces watched the demonstration take place for a time before dispersing the people and making them leave the protest areas.  In Hanoi, the protesters then marched towards Hoan Kiem Lake, a historical landmark of Le Loi and Nguyen Trai’s time, singing the national anthem and chanting anti-Chinese slogans.

From what has been shown so far, the Vietnamese government did not crush the demonstrations in a violent manner.  Though it is never certain, there is no coverage that the Communist police used many repressive tactics to hurt the protesters in Vietnam.  For once, it seems, the Communist Party is actually on the side of the people in regards to this China problem, within their own limits however. 

The future is always uncertain when it comes to the Communists.  One can only hope that similar events such as these occur more often.  What the Communists decide to do now will determine their fate in the near future.  They would be wise not to antagonize their people anymore.  Instead, they should try to make incremental changes to improve the country and better the lives of the people.  Doing so will significantly reduce the bloodshed and violence that will surely take place if this tyranny were to continue any longer.  Governments rise and fall, but the people are forever!

Saigon: The Former “Pearl of the Orient”

Posted in Economics, Modern History, Politics, Society with tags , , on April 7, 2010 by Ian Pham

 

From 1954-1975, Saigon was known as the "Pearl of the Orient."

 

During the Vietnam War, under the leadership of President Ngo Dinh Diem and then later President Nguyen Van Thieu, the city of Saigon was prosperous.  Known for its sophistication, flourishing economy, and rich culture, the city of Saigon earned the name “Pearl of the Orient.”  The bright city streets were filled with busy people and business was booming.  Sadly, this prosperity would only last for a short time.  In 1975 when the Communists took over, Saigon’s name changed to Ho Chi Minh City.  This is the time when things begin to fall apart.  As time goes by, the Communists slowly undo everything that the South had worked so hard to build.  In Ho Chi Minh City today, the appeal and sophistication are gone, economy activity is sub-par, and the culture is none existent.  Children as young as three must work the streets day and night in order to feed themselves.  Beggars and thieves roam freely in the streets and criminals lurk around every corner.  The Communists Police patrol the streets, sometimes for criminals, but most of the time for signs of dissent and discontent with the government.  The city is no longer viewed as “the Pearl of the Orient,” it’s just another place now.