Archive for Southeast Asian Politics

TREASON: Communist Government Leases VIETNAMESE Lands to China for the Next Century

Posted in I. News with tags , , , , , , on June 9, 2018 by Ian Pham

Trong Lu the Bastard(Original photo via VOA)

The Communist Government in Vietnam has taken another devastating step in their quest to hand all of Vietnam over to China.

According to Asia News, the Vietnamese Communist Party, through its fake National Assembly, is preparing for a mock “vote” that will see the ceding of key Vietnamese territory over to China for 99 years, under the guise of what they are calling “special administrative economic zones.”

If the vote passes (and it will, because the communist voting process is a scam, and all decisions have been made beforehand by Party leadership), China will gain full access to several vital locations in Vietnam. These areas, which have been described as “Chinese economic hubs,” are Vietnamese territory that include, “Vân Đồn (Quảng Ninh province), Bắc Vân Phong (Khánh Hòa) and on Phú Quốc Island (Kiên Giang).”

Besides their historical significance, these regions also hold many important economic and strategic aspects, such as natural resources, tourism hubs, shipping lanes, trade routes, and border crossings. Furthermore, these three zones are evenly spread out across the northern, central, and southern regions of Vietnam, making Vietnam vulnerable on all fronts against Chinese encroachment.

The acquisition of these territories, under the pretense of economics, will give China free reign to exploit these Vietnamese lands and all of its resources, and to govern and enforce these lands as they see fit.

Many are warning that, “once in control of these three economic zones, Beijing could deploy armed forces to protect its interests. Once they have granted the concession, Vietnamese authorities will no longer have access to the territories.”

Furthermore, others fear that “By getting these territories, China could control almost all of Vietnam by 2020, exercising its ‘soft power’ on the local economy, finance and culture.”

In short, the Vietnamese Communist Party has, once again, taken a step that gives China a stronger chokehold over Vietnam and its people. The Communist Party in Vietnam are all traitors, cowards, and bastards, who have committed unforgivable crimes against the nation of Vietnam and all of its people, and will continue to do so until Vietnam is no more.

We must not let that happen.

 

CALL TO ACTION:

For anyone who currently wants to take action, but is struggling to figure out how, I would like to share something with you.

The full idea is long, complicated, and the project is still in progress, but for now, here is an introduction.

We all have different skills, tools, and conceptions on how to combat Communism and bring freedom to Vietnam. This one is mine:

Vietnamese Republicanism (Chủ Nghĩa Cộng Hòa Việt Nam) is a political ideology, one that is founded on the three pillars of Democracy (Dân Chủ), Human Rights (Nhân Quyền), and National Defense (Bảo Vệ Quốc Gia). The goal of Vietnamese Republicanism is to destroy Communism and the Communist Party in Vietnam, and establish a free, independent, and strong Vietnamese Republic in its place.

The original English version of “Chapter 1” can be reached HERE, and the Vietnamese translation of the chapter can be reached HERE.

Please give it a read (may take 10-15 minutes per chapter), and if you see merit in what you read, please consider sharing it with your friends, family, or the public. Methods of sharing can begin with social media, word of mouth, and email, but I encourage you to think of other ways, unconventional ways to spread this information.

The more people know about this Vietnamese Republicanism idea, the stronger our position in the fight against the communists will be. We want to reach the people inside Vietnam, most of all, because they have the power to fight from within the country, which is essential.

This is not the only way to fight against the communists, but it is one way, and I believe it will be effective.

If you’re looking for a way to fight against the communists, then may I propose you help spread the word about Vietnamese Republicanism (Chủ Nghĩa Cộng Hòa Việt Nam).

You can start by posting the link of Vietnamese Republicanism / Chủ Nghĩa Cộng Hòa Việt Nam to any social media platform and hitting the “share” button. Then you can come up with more ideas from there. The means don’t matter, as long as the message is delivered. Keep that in mind as you get creative, innovate, and come up with awesome new ideas to reach our ONE objective: Freedom for Vietnam.

Let’s start now.

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1979: The Sino-Vietnamese War (Part II)

Posted in Modern History, Politics with tags , , , , , , , on August 16, 2011 by Ian Pham

Enter Deng Xiaoping

After Vietnam’s swift invasion of Cambodia, tensions between Vietnam and China finally flared to the breaking point.  Deng Xiaoping was enraged by Vietnam’s total domination in the Cambodian conflict and felt obligated to teach Vietnam a lesson in war.  The arrogant Communist leader labelled Vietnam a “hooligan” and vowed to move his PLA into Hanoi in a matter of days.  However, the Chinese Communist leader would be forced to swallow his own harsh words.  Invading Vietnam, as Deng would soon learn, is not an easy endeavour.

Deng Xiaoping had two core objectives when he deployed his forces into Vietnam. The first reason was personal, the Chinese wanted to defeat Vietnam overwhelmingly, the same way that Cambodia was taken down at the hands of the Vietnamese.  This is why Deng Xiapoing claimed that he would teach Vietnam a lesson, boasting to show how superior [he thought] the Chinese military was over Vietnam.  The second reason was political, for Deng wanted to remove Vietnam from Cambodia, thus ending their occupation of a former Chinese ally.  Unfortunately for Deng, as one will find out, neither of these objectives would be met by his PLA.

Le Duan’s Plan

With Deng’s army on the march, Le Duan, Vietnam’s General Secretary, made his own preparations to deal with the Chinese forces.  He had just defeated Pol Pot in war and was now overseeing his country’s occupation. For this reason, Le Duan had to keep most of his forces stationed in Cambodia, leaving him with only the secondary militia to take on the forces of Deng Xiaoping.  This secondary army of Vietnam, to the surprise of all (except the Vietnamese), would be more than enough to take on the Chinese forces.

The Chinese entered Vietnam on February 17, 1979, successfully marching only 7-8 kilometres for the first several days.  The Chinese saw heavy resistance from the People’s Army of Vietnam, who caused them to remain idle for the three days of their invasion.  On the fourth day, after the standstill at the hands of the Vietnamese secondary army, the Chinese forces fought their way towards Cao Bang and Lang Son.  After six days of excruciating battles, the Chinese managed to capture Cao Bang on February 27, with another two days to occupy Lang Son.  It was throughout this period that the Chinese army were encountering difficulties on the battlefield, with the Vietnamese forces waiting at the opposite end.

The Retreat & The Aftermath

On March 5, with the hopes of marching into Hanoi all but crushed, Deng Xiaoping had no other option but to retreat his forces.  On the way back, the Chinese forces, under Deng’s orders, hunted down and killed all of the Vietnamese civilians in their path.  Tens of thousands of innocent civilians, which consisted mostly of women, children, and the elderly, were ruthlessly slaughtered by the Chinese People’s Liberation Army.  The forces of Le Duan were now pursuing the Chinese back to the border, but were slowed down by the trail of land mines left by the murderers of Deng Xiaoping.  The massacre could not be stopped in time, and many thousand innocent lives were lost at the hands of the ever bitter and humiliated Deng Xiaoping.

When his forces were finally withdrawn from Vietnam on March 16, Deng Xiaoping had the nerve to claim victory over Vietnam, shamelessly declaring that he had achieved all his objectives in the war.  What he failed to mention accurately was the three day standstill at the beginning, the seven day halt that followed, and the complete and utter deterioration of his dream of ever reaching Hanoi in the end.  Furthermore, Deng Xiaoping felt no remorse for the many thousands of innocent lives that he had taken on his retreat back to China.  This act of violence happened to such a scale that it can be labelled a war crime.  To sum up, his expedition into Vietnam was a complete disaster, one that he could not bring himself to admit.

Prior to his invasion, Mr. Deng pompously proclaimed that he would teach Vietnam a valuable lesson, pledging to move his army into Hanoi by dinner time.  Because of his arrogance, Deng pushed his soldiers into a military conflict that dragged on for nearly 30 days, costing him an undisclosed number of military bodies said to be around 60,000, possibly even higher. What did he gain out of this?  Not very much.  In the words of author Gerald Segal, “China failed to force a Vietnamese withdrawal from [Cambodia], failed to end border clashes, failed to cast doubt on the strength of the Soviet power, failed to dispel the image of China as a paper tiger, and failed to draw the United States into an anti-Soviet coalition.” Deng Xiaoping sent his army into Vietnam with the intention of teaching the country a lesson, but with his humiliating defeat at the hands of Le Duan and the Vietnamese, it is clear that it was Deng who has been taught a lesson.

1979: The Sino-Vietnamese War (Part I)

Posted in Modern History, Politics with tags , , , , , , , on August 10, 2011 by Ian Pham

The border war between China and Vietnam in 1979 was a controversial one.  Both sides claimed victory, with varying degrees of evidence.  China claimed that it met its objective, that it had taught Vietnam a lesson and that it was time to leave.  Vietnam has then disputed that China never met its objective, that they couldn’t go on fighting, and that they just gave up in the end.  Simply put, the Vietnamese claimed that China lost the war, while the Chinese say different.

One of the causes for this war can be traced back to Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouge.  Pol Pot was the Communist Dictator of Cambodia, and his organization was known as the Khmer Rouge.  The story of Pol Pot is a frightening one.  Not only was his model of Communism extremely idiotic and alien, it turned out to be one of the most destructive policies in the history of Communism.  Pol Pot’s aim was to turn Cambodia into an agrarian socialist society.  He wanted to erase all traces of modern society, envisioning the rise of a new era of civilization, starting with “Year Zero.”

In order to achieve his demented ideal, Pol Pot instituted a nationwide purge of anyone who he believed threatened his political objectives.  The victims of Pol Pot’s executions were mainly teachers, artists, intellectuals, and those in the educated realm.  The purges didn’t stop there.  Certain accounts claim that anyone who showed signs of intelligence were hunted and killed by Pol Pot’s people.  Even those who wore glasses were murdered, simply because they looked like they were the learned type.  As a result of this policy, combined with the poor agricultural reforms of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge as a whole, a staggering number of Cambodia’s population was lost.  The death toll in Cambodia is estimated to be between 2-3 million people.

Besides the genocide he committed on his people, Pol Pot was saw the deterioration of his relations with Vietnam.  From his rule in 1975 to his fall 1978, Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge faced a number of military confrontations against the People’s Army of Vietnam.  As relations soured between Vietnam and Cambodia, Pol Pot switched his sites to the Vietnamese people living in Cambodia, ordering his military to exterminate any ethnic Vietnamese that resided in the country.  With the support of Communist China, Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouge further instigated military conflicts at the Cambodia-Vietnam border, at the same time attacking the ethnic Vietnamese inside the country.

By late 1978, relations with Cambodia completely broke down.  As a result, General Secretary Le Duan of Vietnam ordered a full scale invasion of Cambodia.  Within 24 hours of Le Duan’s command, the Khmer Rouge regime was toppled by Vietnam’s forces, with Pol Pot’s forces driven from the country.  In Pol Pot’s place, a puppet government was installed by the Vietnamese, who were now in formal control of all of Cambodia.  This greatly angered the Communist Party of China, who were in full support of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge.  As retaliation for Vietnam’s total disregard for Sino-Vietnamese relations, the People’s Republic of China mobilized for their invasion of Vietnam.  The Chinese forces were extremely confident of their strength, as famously expressed by Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, “We’ll have breakfast in Lang Son, but we’ll have dinner in Hanoi.”

To Be Continued…

Political Cartoon: Tunisia the Catalyst

Posted in Art, Political Cartoons, Politics with tags , , , , on March 1, 2011 by Ian Pham

Here is a great political cartoon that pretty much speaks for itself.  It all started with Tunisia, then it spread to Egypt, and now Libya.  Needless to say that the Jasmine Revolution in Tunisia was a catalyst, sparking numerous uprisings across North Africa and the Middle East.  These uprisings are fought in the name of freedom and democracy, a big blow to dictatorships everywhere.

This democratic movement has gained tremendous momentum, affecting not only the Middle East, but potentially reaching Asia as well.  It is now common knowledge that the rulers China and Vietnam, the last of the Communist dictatorships, are terrified of what this could mean for their one-party rule.  That is why they are sinking all their resources into preventing their people from becoming aware of the events spreading across the Middle East.

Even so, anonymous democratic organizers are calling upon the people of China to come together and fight the oppressive rule of the Chinese Communist Party.  In Vietnam, the police are preparing for the coming conflict against the Vietnamese population who are ready to fight for their rights and freedoms.  It started in Tunisia, but has swept passed Egypt into Libya, and is now seeping into the tightly controlled totalitarian countries of Vietnam and China.

It is a ticking time bomb, one that these Asian dictatorships are desperately trying to prevent.  This cartoon suggests that the revolutions will not only hit Vietnam and China, but will wash away the oppressive regimes in Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar (Burma) as well.  The governments of all these nations are doing everything they can to keep the Jasmine Revolution from coming to them.

They are scared out of their minds as they witness the fall of their counterparts in distant countries.   Now they must come to terms with the very real possibility of being toppled by their people.  The time is right for the citizens to overthrow these oppressors and bring the world ever closer to a period of peace and cooperation.  We must send our best wishes to all the people in this struggle.  Support the revolution!  Freedom and democracy now!